8 things everybody should know about measles (2024)

sglowrider

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https://www.vox.com/2019/1/29/18201982/measles-outbreak-virus-vaccine-symptoms

US is also seeing a record number of measles cases. Already in 2019, health officials reported the highest number of measles cases since 1994, with more than 700 people infected.

8 things everybody should know about measles (2)

The outbreaks here have been mostly concentrated in just four states: New York, New Jersey, Washington, and California. And among those, the vast majority of cases (474) have occurred in Orthodox Jewish communities in New York City and the New York suburb of Rockland. There, a minority of community members who are vaccine skeptical have been opting out of the shots on behalf of their children, driving vaccine rates down and creating the space for the highly contagious virus to spread.

Darwinism in full effect

And a cruise ship is owned by the Church of Scientology

8 things everybody should know about measles (3)

8 things everybody should know about measles (4)


The Gupta Report

TheOriginalHappyGoat

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#1: It wouldn't be a problem if people got vaccines.

I don't see why there need to be seven other things.

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JamieDimonsBalls

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sglowrider said:

Vaccines don't last forever. I had shots as a kid but may have expired by now.

8 things everybody should know about measles (8)

8 things everybody should know about measles (9)

They are 97% effective and even for the small population that may still get effects, those effects are much more muted than nonvaxers experience.

So far, the two major outbreaks are lead by the ultra religious / conservative Jews and Muslims.

I wouldn't care except for all of the infants at risk that don't need to be.

Aloha Hoosier

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sglowrider said:

https://www.vox.com/2019/1/29/18201982/measles-outbreak-virus-vaccine-symptoms

US is also seeing a record number of measles cases. Already in 2019, health officials reported the highest number of measles cases since 1994, with more than 700 people infected.

8 things everybody should know about measles (11)

Darwinism in full effect

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And a cruise ship is owned by the Church of Scientology

8 things everybody should know about measles (12)

8 things everybody should know about measles (13)


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The Gupta Report

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People are stupid. Some people are more stupid.

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sglowrider

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Aloha Hoosier said:

People are stupid. Some people are more stupid.

Or, better lucky than clever -- I come from a family of doctors from a GP to a Gynae to a Pediatric, all under one roof. Full-service family clinic. I have had every jab know to mankind.

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sglowrider

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JamieDimonsBalls said:

They are 97% effective and even for the small population that may still get effects, those effects are much more muted than nonvaxers experience.

So far, the two major outbreaks are lead by the ultra religious / conservative Jews and Muslims.

I wouldn't care except for all of the infants at risk that don't need to be.


Philippines Reports 31,056 Measles Cases in 2019
https://www.vaxbeforetravel.com/women-who-get-measles-vaccine-should-wait-4-weeks-getting-pregnant

And why do I care? We get our housemaids here from the Philippines.

8 things everybody should know about measles (18)

8 things everybody should know about measles (19)

Aloha Hoosier

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sglowrider said:

Or, better lucky than clever -- I come from a family of doctors from a GP to a Gynae to a Pediatric, all under one roof. Full-service family clinic. I have had every jab know to mankind.

I was vaccinated all the time during my military career. Doesn’t make sense to allow your military to be down with the measles or polio or something. I’ve got little respect for antivaxxers. I realize most sincerely believe the stupid things they believe about vaccines, but that doesn’t make them less wrong, or their actions less dangerous to the populace.

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sglowrider

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Aloha Hoosier said:

I was vaccinated all the time during my military career. Doesn’t make sense to allow your military to be down with the measles or polio or something. I’ve got little respect for antivaxxers. I realize most sincerely believe the stupid things they believe about vaccines, but that doesn’t make them less wrong, or their actions less dangerous to the populace.

Science is the work of the Devil.

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IUCrazy2

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A mixture of those who have been convinced that the vaccinations have led to a rise in things like autism by hucksters and know-nothings and a porous border that often imports second and third world illnesses along with the downtrodden.

We have idiocracy in charge. Always.

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Joe_Hoopsier

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“ since the illness was declared Eliminated in the United States in 2000.”

More science reports, like climate change?

M

mashnut

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Circlejoe

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TheOriginalHappyGoat

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IUCrazy2 said:

A mixture of those who have been convinced that the vaccinations have led to a rise in things like autism by hucksters and know-nothings and a porous border that often imports second and third world illnesses along with the downtrodden.

We have idiocracy in charge. Always.

The measles outbreaks aren't coming from people crossing the border. They are coming from Americans traveling abroad.

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sglowrider

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8 things everybody should know about measles (31)

DrHoops

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It's amazing that the information about vaccines are out there for everyone who has an interest to see and get the facts. Yet I've spoken with people who are otherwise fairly smart and they will say stuff like "yeah, but why take the chance?" Or, "They're giving too many vaccines at a time. No one REALLY knows the effects of giving them so close together."

It's frustrating as hell.

Aloha Hoosier said:

I was vaccinated all the time during my military career. Doesn’t make sense to allow your military to be down with the measles or polio or something. I’ve got little respect for antivaxxers. I realize most sincerely believe the stupid things they believe about vaccines, but that doesn’t make them less wrong, or their actions less dangerous to the populace.

DrHoops

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Yeah, man! Facts suck! Science is inconvenient to us. Let's go by our gut feelings!!!! 8 things everybody should know about measles (34)

Joe_Hoopsier said:

“ since the illness was declared Eliminated in the United States in 2000.”

More science reports, like climate change?

JamieDimonsBalls

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8 things everybody should know about measles (2024)

FAQs

What do you need to know about measles? ›

Measles can affect anyone but is most common in children. Measles infects the respiratory tract and then spreads throughout the body. Symptoms include a high fever, cough, runny nose and a rash all over the body. Being vaccinated is the best way to prevent getting sick with measles or spreading it to other people.

What are some unique facts about measles? ›

Measles is spread through the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes. It's one of the most contagious diseases on the planet — so contagious that if one person has it, 90% of people close to that person who are not immune will also become infected.

What are some facts about the emerge of measles? ›

Key points
  • In the 9th century, a Persian doctor published one of the first written accounts of measles disease.
  • Widespread use of measles vaccine drastically reduced the disease rates in the 20th century.
  • The United States has maintained measles elimination status for over 20 years.
May 9, 2024

Do and don'ts for measles? ›

DOs and DON'Ts in Managing Measles:

DO cover your mouth when coughing. DO wash hands regularly and encourage others to do so. DO use a cool-mist vaporizer to soothe coughing. DO use saline eye drops for irritation and sunglasses for light sensitivity.

Why is it important to know about measles? ›

Measles is a very contagious disease that causes fever, a red rash, cough and watery eyes. It can have serious complications in some people. Getting the measles vaccine is the best way to prevent getting and spreading measles.

Why is measles serious? ›

The virus can cause additional complications such as ear infections, pneumonia and diarrhea. A serious complication is acute encephalitis, or inflammation of the brain, which can result in permanent brain damage in one of every 1,000 cases.

What is the rarest complication of the measles? ›

Measles is known to cause serious early and late complications, such as pneumonia, encephalitis, and subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE)[1]. Other rare complications have also been described in the literature, such as pulmonary embolism, pancreatitis, and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) [5-7].

What year was measles the worst? ›

In 1980, 2.6 million people died from measles, and in 1990, 545,000 died due to the disease; by 2014, global vaccination programs had reduced the number of deaths from measles to 73,000. Despite these trends, rates of disease and deaths increased from 2017 to 2019 due to a decrease in immunization.

What are the stages of the measles? ›

The clinical picture of measles can be divided into three stages: prodromal, eruptive, and convalescent and should be suspected in patients with the classic triad of the three “Cs”: cough, conjunctivitis, and coryza.

What does measles turn into? ›

Complications of measles

Measles can lead to serious problems if it spreads to other parts of the body, such as the lungs or brain. Problems that can be caused by measles include: pneumonia. meningitis.

What animal did measles come from? ›

Where Did Measles Come From? The origin of measles is thought to have been zoonotic, evolving from Rinderpest (an infectious viral disease found in cattle, bison, and other hooved animals).

Where was measles first discovered? ›

The Persian physician Rhazes gave the first clinical description of the disease in the 10th century, clearly differentiating it from smallpox. Measles spread worldwide from the Renaissance. Its epidemiology was remarkably studied in 1846 by a Danish physician, Peter Panum, during an epidemic in the Faroe Islands.

What stops measles? ›

Getting vaccinated is the best way to help prevent measles. Two doses of the measles vaccine are 97% effective at preventing measles. There are two vaccines available — the MMR vaccine and the MMRV vaccine. The MMR vaccine is a three-in-one vaccination that can protect you from measles, mumps, and rubella.

Can you catch measles twice? ›

A person can spread measles from four days before through four days after the appearance of the rash. Can a person get measles more than once? No. Infection makes a person immune for the rest of their life; that means they cannot get it again.

Does measles cause weight loss? ›

If these needs are not met at the time of the illness, or SOOR after, there would be weight loss, or at least failure to gain weight. Many illnesses, including measles, are accompanied by anorexia and the mouth ulcers so frequently present during ;nd after measles would compound the feeding difficulties.

Do I need to worry about measles? ›

Measles—once a common, often lethal illness—is now quite rare, and is often relegated to that “no worry” list. However, when cases of measles occur, they are dangerous, particularly for children under the age of 5. That's because measles is one of the world's most contagious diseases.

What should you do if you catch measles? ›

Measles usually starts to get better in about a week. After seeing a GP, there are things you can do to help ease the symptoms and reduce the risk of spreading the infection. It can help to: rest and drink plenty fluids, such as water, to avoid dehydration.

When should I be concerned about measles? ›

you've been in close contact with someone who has measles and you've not been fully vaccinated (had 2 doses of the MMR vaccine) or haven't had the infection before – even if you don't have any symptoms. you've been in close contact with someone who has measles and you're pregnant – measles can be serious in pregnancy.

Do you have to quarantine if exposed to measles? ›

Quarantine is for non-immune people who have been in contact with someone with measles. It is an important part of stopping measles spreading in the community, especially to high risk people.

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